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CUPRESSACEAE

Field Guide to the Moist Forest Trees of Tanzania

Jon C. Lovett, Chris K. Ruffo, Roy E. Gereau & James R.D. Taplin
Illustrations by Line Sørensen & Jilly Lovett

CUPRESSACEAE

Juniperus procera Hochst. ex Endl.


Syn. FTEA: NC.
Syn. TTCL: J. procera Hochst. ex A. Rich.
Syn. other: The name J. excelsa M. Bieb. has been used, but this species is now thought to be distinct and does not occur in Africa.
Local names: East African Juniper (E), East African Pencil Cedar (E), Mbechera (K), Mselemko (K), Msingo (Me), Mso (C), Mtarakwa (C), Mwangati (S), Nderakwa (Me), Ol darakwa (A, M), Ol tarakwa (A, M), Selemuka (Ny), Semit (Ba).
Bole: Straight/fluted. Large. To 40 m.
Bark: Pale brown, thin, fibrous, cracking and peeling in long narrow strips.
Slash: Pale yellow. Fibrous. Resinous smell.
Leaf: Simple. Opposite/whorled.
Petiole: Sessile.
Lamina: Small. Juvenile: 0.8 – 1 × 0.1 cm. Adult: 0.1 × 0.1 cm. Lanceolate when young, becoming scales. Cuneate. Acute. Entire. Glabrous.
Domatia: Absent.
Glands: Present. Juvenile leaves with a linear gland on the back and adult leaves with an elliptic oil gland on the back near the base.
Stipules: Absent.
Thorns & Spines: Absent.
Flower: Cones. Dioecious.
Fruit: Brown/black berry-like cone, 0.4 – 0.8 cm in diameter with 1 – 4 seeds.
Ecology: Dry montane forest.
Distr: EA (Us only), N, LN. Arabian Peninsula and Ethiopia to Zimbabwe.
Notes: NR.
Uses: Wood used for timber, building poles, roof shingles, beehives, storage pots, trays for drying food stuffs, flooring and posts. The tree is also used for ornamental hedges and wind breaks. The wood and leaves are used by WaMasai for smoking milk pots, the leaves alone are used for stomach-ache and as a hot bath for the treatment of fever.
Last Updated: 21 March 2017