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LEGUMINOSAE MIMOSOIDEAE

Field Guide to the Moist Forest Trees of Tanzania

Jon C. Lovett, Chris K. Ruffo, Roy E. Gereau & James R.D. Taplin
Illustrations by Line Sørensen & Jilly Lovett

LEGUMINOSAE (FABACEAE): MIMOSOIDEAE

Acacia kirkii Oliv. subsp. kirkii
Syn. FTEA: NC.
Syn. TTCL: A. kirkii Oliv.
Syn. other: NR.
Local names: Mgunga (Sw), Mlelawana (G), Ollerai (M).
Bole: Flat crown. Small/medium. To 15 m.
Bark: Green. Peeling/scaling.
Slash: NR.
Leaf: Bipinnate. Pinnae 6 – 14 pairs.
Petiole: Rachis 3 – 8 cm.
Lamina: Small. 0.2 – 0.5 × 0.1 cm. Oblong/oblong-linear. Cuneate. Obtuse. Entire.
Domatia: NR.
Glands: Young branchlets with numerous reddish sessile glands.
Stipules: Spinescent.
Thorns & Spines: Spines up to 8 cm long.
Flower: Red. Axillary heads.
Fruit: Pod. Indehiscent. 3.5 – 9 × 0.8 – 2.1 cm.
Ecology: Riverine, groundwater forest.
Distr: N, LT. Eastern and Southern Tropical Africa.
Notes: Joints of pod with wart-like projections.
Uses: The wood is not durable. It is used for firewood and for construction of cattle and farm enclosures. The bark is aromatic and is used by the WaMasai for making tea. Roots are used as a medicine for stomach diseases.
Acacia kirkii Oliv. subsp. mildbraedii (Harms) Brenan
Syn. FTEA: NC.
Syn. TTCL: A. mildbraedii Harms
Syn. other: NR.
Local names: Mgunga (Sw), Mlelawana (G), Ollerai (M).
Bole: Flat crown. Small/medium. To 15 m.
Bark: Green. Peeling/scaling.
Slash: NR.
Leaf: Bipinnate. Pinnae 6 – 14 pairs.
Petiole: Rachis 3 – 8 cm.
Lamina: Small. 0.2 – 0.5 × 0.1 cm. Oblong/oblong-linear. Cuneate. Obtuse. Entire.
Domatia: NR.
Glands: Young branchlets with numerous reddish sessile glands.
Stipules: Spinescent.
Thorns & Spines: Spines up to 8 cm long.
Flower: Red. Axillary heads.
Fruit: Pod. Indehiscent. 3.5 – 9 × 0.8 – 2.1 cm.
Ecology: Riverine, groundwater forest.
Distr: LV. Central Tropical Africa, Uganda. Notes: Joints of pod without wart-like projections.
Uses: The wood is not durable. It is used for firewood and for construction of cattle and farm enclosures. The bark is aromatic and is used by the WaMasai for making tea. Roots are used as a medicine for stomach diseases.
Acacia polyacantha Willd. subsp. campylacantha (Hochst. ex A. Rich.) Brenan
Syn. FTEA: NC.
Syn. TTCL: A. campylacantha Hochst. ex A. Rich.
Syn. other: NR.
Local names: Mkengewa (Sw), Mkwanga (Ngi), Mgupulu (N), Mtonya (Mt), Muwindi (L).
Bole: Medium. To 21 m.
Bark: Fissured. Knobbly persistent prickles. White/yellow-grey.
Slash: NR.
Leaf: Bipinnate. Pinnae (6 -) 13 – 40 (- 60) pairs. Lflts: (15 -) 26 – 64 pairs.
Petiole: NR.
Lamina: Small. 0.2 – 0.5 (- 0.6) × 0.1 cm. Linear. Cuneate. Acute/obtuse. Entire. Glabrous/hairy on margins.
Domatia: NR.
Glands: Petiole and rachis glandular.
Stipules: Not spinescent.
Thorns & Spines: Prickles hooked in pairs below the each node /sometimes absent.
Flower: Cream/white. Spikes.
Fruit: Pods brown. Dehiscent. 7 – 18 × 1 – 2.1 cm.
Ecology: Riverine, groundwater forest. Woodland. Grassland. Thicket.
Distr: C, EA, N, LN, LT, LV. Widespread in Tropical and Southern Africa.
Notes: On rich alluvial soils.
Uses: The sapwood is perishable and is used mainly for firewood and charcoal. The heartwood is durable and used for buildings, carvings and pestles. Leaves are dried, pounded and the powder is rubbed into heads of children who are suffering from head sores. Roots are used for treating snake bites.
Acacia robusta Burch. subsp. usambarensis (Taub.) Brenan
Syn. FTEA: A. clavigera E. Mey. subsp. usambarensis (Taub.) Brenan
Syn. TTCL: A. usambarensis Taub.
Syn. other: NR.
Local names: Mgunga (Sw), Muhongo (Ngi), Mkongowe (L).
Bole: Small/medium. To 25 m.
Bark: Grey/dark brown. Smooth/fissured.
Slash: NR.
Leaf: Bipinnate. 2 – 10 pairs of pinnae. Alternate. Lflts: 9 – 27 pairs leaflets per pinnae. Pinnae: opposite. Leaflets: opposite.
Petiole: 3 – 7 cm.
Lamina: Small. 0.4 – 0.7 × 0.1 – 0.4 cm. Oblong. Cuneate. Asymmetrical. Apiculate. Entire. Glabrous.
Domatia: NR.
Glands: Absent.
Stipules: Spinescent.
Thorns & Spines: Spines. Straight/curved. Up to 0.7 cm long.
Flower: White. Fragrant. Axillary head/peduncles.
Fruit: Pods falcate. Glabrous. Linear. 11 – 19 × 0.7 – 1.7 cm. Dehiscent.
Ecology: Riverine, groundwater forest. Woodland.
Distr: C, EA, N, LT. Central and Eastern Kenya, Mozambique.
Notes: The typical subsp. is from South-eastern Tropical Africa.
Uses: The heartwood is hard and heavy. It is used for building houses, pestles, firewood and charcoal. The tree has been reported to have been used by Arabs against malaria. It is also used as part of a remedy against bubonic plague.
Acacia rovumae Oliv.
Syn. FTEA: NC.
Syn. TTCL: A. chrysothrix Taub.
Syn. other: NR.
Local names: Mgunga (Sw). Mgawa (S).
Bole: Small. To 15 m.
Bark: Dark grey/grey green.
Slash: NR.
Leaf: Bipinnate. 6 – 9 pairs of pinnae, 13 – 31 pairs of leaflets per pinna. Lflts: Opposite.
Petiole: With rachis: 8 – 15 cm.
Lamina: Small. 0.4 – 0.8 × 0.2 – 0.3 cm. Oblong. Cuneate. Asymmetric. Acute/obtuse. Glabrous beneath/hairy on nerves.
Domatia: Absent.
Glands: On petioles.
Stipules: Not spinescent.
Thorns & Spines: Prickles in pairs below nodes. Straight/slightly curved.
Flower: White with red calyx. Spikes.
Fruit: Pods irregularly breaking up. Glabrous. 7 – 15 × 1.7 – 2.5 cm.
Ecology: Lowland, riverine, saline groundwater forest.
Distr: C. Eastern Tropical Africa. Madagascar.
Notes: NR.
Uses: The heartwood is heavy, hard and used for building houses and pestles. It is also used for firewood and charcoal.
Acacia xanthophloea Benth.
Syn. FTEA: NC.
Syn. TTCL: NC.
Syn. other: NR.
Local names: Mgunga (Sw), Mwerera (P), Mweda (R), Olerai (M).
Bole: Samll/medium. To 25 m.
Bark: Yellow/green-yellow.
Slash: NR.
Leaf: Bipinnate. 3 – 6 (- 8) pairs pinnae. Lflts: Numerous.
Petiole: Rachis (2.5 -) 3 – 7 cm.
Lamina: Small. 0.3 – 0.7 × 0.1 cm.
Domatia: NR.
Glands: NR.
Stipules: Spinescent.
Thorns & Spines: Spines straight up to 7 cm.
Flower: White/pink or yellow/golden.
Fruit: Pods indehiscent. (3 -) 4 – 13.5 × 0.7 – 1.4 cm. Breaking into segments.
Ecology: Groundwater and riverine forest.
Distr: EA, N, LN, LT. Eastern and Southern Africa.
Notes: Northern populations with white/pink flowers, and southern populations with yellow/golden flowers. The famous fever tree cited in Rudyard Kipling’s story about the Elephant’s child.
Uses: The heartwood is moderately hard and heavy. It is used as a general purpose timber and for firewood and charcoal. The tree is used for avenues.
Albizia adianthifolia (Schumach.) W. Wight
Syn. FTEA: NC.
Syn. TTCL: Species B under Albizzia gummifera (Gmel.) C.A. Sm.
Syn. other: NR.
Local names: Mkenge (Sw), Mshai (S), Mtanga wa msitu (Ngi).
Bole: Small/medium. To 30 m.
Bark: Grey/yellow-brown. Rough/smooth.
Slash: Pale yellow. Fibrous. Smell of crushed pea pods.
Leaf: Bipinnate, 5 – 8 pairs of pinnae, 9 – 7 pairs of leaflets per pinna. Alternate. Pinnae: Opposite. Lflts: Opposite.
Petiole: Leaflets sessile with a pulvinus. Rachis: Slightly Channelled. Slight pulvinus on petiolule base.
Lamina: Small. 0.7 – 2 × 0.4 – 1 cm. Elliptic. Cuneate. Asymmetrical. Obtuse/mucronate. Entire. Hairy on veins. Simple.
Domatia: Absent.
Glands: One gland at tip of rachis.
Stipules: Small/large. Ovate. 0.5 – 1.2 cm long. Falling.
Thorns & Spines: Absent.
Flower: White-green. Axillary half spherical heads. Hermaphrodite.
Fruit: Brown flat straight oblong pod. 9 – 19 cm long. 1.9 – 3.2 cm wide.
Ecology: Dry lowland, lowland and submontane forest. Woodland. Upland grassland.
Distr: C, EA, LN, LT, LV. Tropical and Southern Africa. Madagascar.
Notes: Staminal tube projecting beyond corolla. Leaves pubescent.
Uses: The wood is straight-grained and used as timber which is suitable for general building constructions, parquet blocks and flooring strips. It is also used for firewood and charcoal. The tree provides good shade for coffee farms. The bark is known to be poisonous.
Albizia coriaria Welw. ex Oliv.
Syn. FTEA: NC.
Syn. TTCL: NC.
Syn. other: NR.
Local names: Mugavu (Common), Mkenge (Sw).
Bole: Medium/large. To 36 m.
Bark: Rough/flaking.
Slash: NR.
Leaf: Bipinnate. Pinnae: (2 -) 3 – 6 (- 8) pairs. Lflts: (4 -) 6 – 11 (- 12) pairs.
Petiole: NR.
Lamina: Small. 1.3 – 3.3 × 0.5 – 1.4 (- 1.7) cm. Oblong/elliptic/ovate-oblong. Obtuse. Entire. Glabrous/few hairs beneath.
Domatia: NR.
Glands: NR.
Stipules: NR.
Thorns & Spines: Absent.
Flower: White.
Fruit: Brown oblong glabrous pod. (10 -) 14 – 21 × (2.3 -) 3.2 – 3.7 (- 4.8) cm.
Ecology: Riverine forest. Grasslands.
Distr: LV. Western and Central Africa, Uganda, Western Kenya.
Notes: Staminal tube not projecting beyond corolla.
Uses: The heartwood is hard, durable and used for building houses, firewood, charcoal, pestles and tool handles. The bark is used for treating gonorrhea, threatened abortion and bleeding after delivery.
Albizia glaberrima (Schumach. & Thonn.) Benth.
Syn. FTEA: NC.
Syn. TTCL: Albizzia glabrescens Oliv.
Syn. other: NR.
Local names: Kafunampasa (T), Mugavu (Common), Mkenge-maji (Sw).
Bole: Small/medium. To 24 m.
Bark: Grey/smooth.
Slash: NR.
Leaf: Bipinnate. 1 – 3 pairs of pinnae. 3 – 6 pairs of leaflets per pinna. Alternate. Lflts: Pinnae: Opposite. Leaflets: Opposite.
Petiole: With rachis: 4.5 – 7 cm.
Lamina: Small. 2 – 7 × 1 – 3 cm. Elliptic/oblong. Cuneate. Asymmetrical. Obtuse. Entire. Glabrous.
Domatia: Absent.
Glands: Absent.
Stipules: Falling.
Thorns & Spines: Absent.
Flower: Pink with white stamens. Axillary head.
Fruit: Yellow-brown thin pods. Glossy. 12 – 26 × 3 – 4.2 cm.
Ecology: Dry lowland, lowland and submontane forest.
Distr: C, EA, LT. Tropical Africa. Comoros.
Notes: Three varieties. Staminal tube not projecting beyond corolla. Leaves mostly glabrous.
Uses: The wood is used for timber, firewood, charcoal, stools, beehives, tool handles and grain mortars. The tree is used for shade and as a bee forage.
Albizia grandibracteata Taub.
Syn. FTEA: NC.
Syn. TTCL: NC.
Syn. other: NR.
Local names: Nongo (Common), Mkenge (Sw).
Bole: Small/medium. To 30 m.
Bark: Smooth/pock marked at base. Lenticels in vertical columns.
Slash: NR.
Leaf: Bipinnate. Pinnae: (1 -) 2 – 3 pairs. Lflts: Of distal pinnae: 3 – 6 pairs.
Petiole: NR.
Lamina: Small. Largest distal leaflet: 2.9 – 7.2 (- 10) × 1.6 – 3.2 cm. Obovate. Cuneate. Asymmetrical. Acute. Entire. Glabrous/hairy beneath.
Domatia: NR.
Glands: NR.
Stipules: 0.7 – 1.8 × 0.8 – 2.0 cm. Falling.
Thorns & Spines: Absent.
Flower: Pink/white.
Fruit: Pod 7 – 15 × 1.5 – 3 cm.
Ecology: NR.
Distr: LV. Uganda, Kenya, Burundi, Sudan, Democratic Republic of Congo.
Notes: Deciduous. Staminal tube pink/red projecting beyond corolla.
Uses: Used for timber, poles, firewood, charcoal, tool handles and stools. The tree provides good shade. Roots are used for treating tonsillitis by gargling the infusion.
Albizia gummifera (J.F. Gmel.) C.A. Sm.
Syn. FTEA: NC.
Syn. TTCL: Albizzia laevicorticata Zimm.
Syn. other: NR.
Local names: Mfuranje (C), Mkenge (Sw), Msaamaji (R), Msanga (P), Mshai (S), Mtanga (H), Ol geturai (M).
Bole: Medium/large. To 30 m.
Bark: Grey. Smooth.
Slash: Yellow/orange. Granular.
Leaf: Bipinnate, 5 – 7 pinnae, 9 – 16 leaflets per pinna. Alternate. Pinnae: Opposite. Lflts: Opposite.
Petiole: Leaflets sessile with a pulvinus. Rachis: Slightly Channelled.
Lamina: Small. 1 – 2 × 0.5 – 1 cm. Elliptic. Cuneate. Asymmetrical. Obtuse/acute. Entire. Glabrous/hairy on midrib and rachis. Simple.
Domatia: Absent.
Glands: Present/absent. On upper side of rachis.
Stipules: Small. Lanceolate. 0.6 – 0.7 cm long. Falling.
Thorns & Spines: Absent.
Flower: White and red. Axillary heads. Hermaphrodite.
Fruit: Pale brown flat oblong pod. 10 – 21 × 2 – 3.4 cm.
Ecology: Riverine, dry lowland, montane and dry montane forest.
Distr: C, EA, N, LN, LT, LV. Tropical Africa. Madagascar.
Notes: Two varieties. Staminal tube projecting beyond corolla. Leaves mostly glabrous.
Uses: Used for timber, firewood, charcoal, poles, grain mortars, beds and handles. The bark is used for treating malaria. A bath made from pounded roots soaked in water is used to cure skin diseases. An extract from crushed pods is drunk for stomach pains.
Albizia petersiana (Bolle) Oliv. subsp. petersiana
Syn. FTEA: A. petersiana (Bolle) Oliv.
Syn. TTCL: Albizzia brachycalyx Oliv.
Syn. other: NR.
Local names: Mkenge (Sw), Msisigulu (N), Mtanga mbelete (Ngi), Mwilu (C).
Bole: Small/medium. To 21 m.
Bark: Grey. Smooth.
Slash: NR.
Leaf: Bipinnate. 2 – 5 pairs pinnae. 5 – 12 pairs leaflets per pinna. Leaves Alternate. Pinnae Opposite. Lflts: Opposite.
Petiole: NR.
Lamina: Small. 0.5 – 2 × 0.2 – 2 cm. Obovate. Cuneate. Asymmetrical. Acute/mucronate. Entire. Glabrous/small hairs beneath.
Domatia: NR.
Glands: NR.
Stipules: Small. Falling.
Thorns & Spines: Absent.
Flower: White/pink. Staminal tube red. Axillary.
Fruit: Red/purple. Oblong pods. 4 – 15 × 1.7 – 3 cm.
Ecology: Riverine, groundwater forest. Termite mounds in woodlands.
Distr: C, EA, N, LV. Widespread in Eastern and Southeastern Tropical Africa.
Notes: Deciduous.
Uses: The wood is straight-grained and hard. It is used for timber, firewood, building poles, tool handles, spoons, bows and carriage beams. Leaves are used by WaNyamwezi for treating stomach-ache while roots are used for hernia and lung diseases. The bark is pounded, soaked in water and taken three times a day for rheumatism.
Albizia schimperiana Oliv.
Syn. FTEA: NC.
Syn. TTCL: Albizzia maranguensis Taub., A. amaniensis Baker f.
Syn. other: NR.
Local names: Mfuranje (C), Mkenge (Sw), Mshai (S), Olsanguwesi (A).
Bole: Straight. Medium. To 30 m.
Bark: Grey/brown. Smooth/rough.
Slash: NR.
Leaf: Bipinnate. Pinnae: 2 – 7 pairs. Leaflets: 6 – 21 pairs. Alternate. Pinnae: Opposite. Lflts: Opposite.
Petiole: Leaflets sessile. Pulvinus at base of petiolules. Rachis: Channelled.
Lamina: Small. 0.7 – 2.1 × 0.4 – 0.9 cm. Oblong. Cuneate. Asymmetrical. Acute/mucronate. Entire. Hairy beneath. Simple.
Domatia: Absent.
Glands: Between pinnae on upper side of rachis.
Stipules: Falling.
Thorns & Spines: Absent.
Flower: White/pale yellow. Axillary heads. Hermaphrodite.
Fruit: Brown flattened pod 18 – 34 × 2.8 – 5.9 cm.
Ecology: Riverine, groundwater, lowland, submontane, dry montane and montane forest. Upland thicket.
Distr: EA, N, LN. Eastern, Central and Southern Tropical Africa.
Notes: Three varieties.
Uses: Used for timber, firewood, charcoal, tool handles, beehives, stools, grain mortars, spoons and shade for coffee farms. The infusion from the bark is added to porridge made from germinated flour of finger millet and drunk to cure headache and generalized body pains.
Albizia zimmermannii Harms
Syn. FTEA: NC.
Syn. TTCL: NC.
Syn. other: NR.
Local names: Mkenge (Sw), Mshai (S), Mtanga wa bondeni (Ngi).
Bole: Small/medium. To 20 m.
Bark: Grey/brown. Smooth/fissured.
Slash: NR.
Leaf: Bipinnate, 3 – 6 pairs pinnae, 8 – 17 pairs of leaflets per pinna. Alternate. Pinnae: Opposite. Lflts: Opposite.
Petiole: Leaflets sessile. Rachis: shallowly Channelled.
Lamina: Small. 0.5 – 1.5 × 0.5 – 1 cm. Elliptic/oblong. Cuneate. Asymmetrical. Obtuse. Entire. Glabrous/hairy.
Domatia: Absent.
Glands: Absent.
Stipules: Falling.
Thorns & Spines: Absent.
Flower: White/pink. Round heads. Axillary/terminal. Hermaphrodite.
Fruit: Red/brown. Oblong pod. 15 – 32 × 3.8 – 7 cm.
Ecology: Riverine, dry lowland and lowland forest. Forest edge. Secondary.
Distr: C, EA, N. Eastern Tropical Africa.
Notes: Staminal tube not projecting beyond corolla. Pod broad. Leaves small and pubescent. Deciduous.
Uses: The wood is used for firewood, charcoal, tool handles and grain mortars. The tree is used for shade and avenues.
Albizia zygia (DC.) J.F. Macbr
Syn. FTEA: NC.
Syn. TTCL: NC.
Syn. other: NR.
Local names: Nongo (Common), Mkenge (Sw).
Bole: Small/large. To 30 m.
Bark: Rough/smooth.
Slash: NR.
Leaf: Bipinnate. Pinnae: (1 -) 2 – 3 (- 4) pairs. Leaflets of distal pairs of pinnae: 2 – 5.
Petiole: NR.
Lamina: Small. 2.9 – 7.2 × 1.6 – 4.3 cm. Obovate. Cuneate. Asymmetric. Obtuse/acute. Entire. Glabrous/hairs on midrib and margins.
Domatia: NR.
Glands: NR.
Stipules: Small. Triangular-lanceolate. 0.2 – 0.7 × 0.1 – 0.2 cm. Falling.
Thorns & Spines: Absent.
Flower: White/pink.
Fruit: Pod oblong, flat. 10 – 18 × 2 – 4 cm.
Ecology: Riverine, lowland forest. Wooded grassland.
Distr: LT, LV. Tropical Africa.
Notes: Staminal tube red projecting beyond corolla.
Uses: Used for timber which makes good furniture, door frames, building construction, firewood, charcoal, poles and grain mortars. The tree is good for shade.
Faidherbia albida (Delile) A. Chev.
Syn. FTEA: Acacia albida Del.
Syn. TTCL: Acacia albida Del.
Syn. other: NR.
Local names: Mchese (F), Mkababu (Sw), Mluma (G), Mpogolo (H), Mrunda (Ha).
Bole: Medium/large. To 30 m.
Bark: Brown/green-grey. Rough.
Slash: NR.
Leaf: Bipinnate. (2 -) 3 – 10 pairs pinnae. Lflts: 6 – 23 pairs.
Petiole: NR.
Lamina: Small. 0.3 – 1.2 × 0.1 – 0.4 cm. Acute/mucronate. Entire.
Domatia: NR.
Glands: At junction of each of the pinnae.
Stipules: Spinescent.
Thorns & Spines: Spines up to 1.3 (- 2.3) cm.
Flower: Cream.
Fruit: Bright orange. Indehiscent. Coiled. 6 – 25 × 2 – 3.5 cm.
Ecology: Riverine, groundwater forest. Woodland.
Distr: EA, LN, LT, LV. Widespread in Tropical and Southern Africa. Arabian Peninsula.
Notes: There are several races.
Uses: The wood is very hard and heavy. It is used for timber, firewood, poles, pestles, stools and tool handles. pods and leaves are used for fodder. The tree is important in agroforestry as it bears leaves in the dry season, fixes nitrogen, and provides shade for coffee farms. Roots are used as medicine to cure coughs and diarrhoea.
Newtonia buchananii (Baker f.) G. C. C. Gilbert & Boutique
Syn. FTEA: NC.
Syn. TTCL: Piptadenia buchananii Baker
Syn. other: NR.
Local names: Mkufi (C), Mnyasa (S), Mtanga (F).
Bole: Straight. Large buttresses. Large. To 40 m.
Bark: Pale brown. Smooth. Red edge to buttresses.
Slash: Pale yellow/white. Occasional honey coloured exudate.
Leaf: Bipinnate, 12 – 23 pairs pinnae, 38 – 67 leaflets per pinna. Alternate. Pinnae: Opposite. Lflts: Opposite.
Petiole: Leaflets sessile. Rachis: Channelled.
Lamina: Very small. 0.2 – 0.6 × 0.1 cm. Lanceolate. Cuneate. Obtuse. Entire. Hairy on edges and rachis. Simple.
Domatia: Absent.
Glands: Stipitate glands on rachis.
Stipules: Linear. 0.4 cm long.
Thorns & Spines: Absent.
Flower: Yellow. Axillary spikes 3.5 – 19 cm long. Hermaphrodite.
Fruit: Long pods 10 – 32 × 1.3 – 2.5 cm. Seeds winged.
Ecology: Riverine, groundwater, lowland, submontane and montane forest.
Distr: C, EA, N, LN, LT, LV. Eastern, Central, and Southern Tropical Africa.
Notes: NR.
Uses: The wood is heavy and hard. It is used for timber, firewood, charcoal, tool handles, grain mortars and spoons. The tree provides good shade and is suitable for avenue planting.
Newtonia hildebrandtii (Vatke) Torre
Syn. FTEA: NC.
Syn. TTCL: Piptadenia hildebrandtii Vatke
Syn. other: NR.
Local names: Mkami (P), Mkengelechuma (H).
Bole: Medium. To 25 m.
Bark: Dark grey. Rough/smooth. Flaking. Branchlets puberuluos, flaking.
Slash: Red.
Leaf: Bipinnate. 4 – 7 pairs pinnae. 6 – 19 pairs leaflets. Alternate. Lflts: Pinnae: Opposite. Leaflets: Opposite.
Petiole: NR.
Lamina: Very small. 0.3 – 1 × 0.1 – 0.3 cm. Oblong/linear-oblong.
Domatia: NR.
Glands: Cylindrical gland between each pinna pair.
Stipules: NR.
Thorns & Spines: Absent.
Flower: White. Spikes.
Fruit: Pod. 9 – 30 × 2.2 – 2.6 cm.
Ecology: Riverine, groundwater, dry lowland forest.
Distr: C, EA, N. Eastern and Southern Africa.
Notes: Two varieties.
Uses: The wood is red, hard and heavy. It is used for building houses, pestles, carvings, fencing poles, pegs, combs and clubs. Roots are boiled and the decoction is used as medicine for intestinal worms.
Newtonia paucijuga (Harms) Brenan
Syn. FTEA: NC.
Syn. TTCL: Piptadenia paucijuga Harms, Cylicodiscus battiscombei Baker f.
Syn. other: NR.
Local names: Mkunguni, Mpilipili (Sw), Myovu (Z).
Bole: Straight. Large. To 30 m.
Bark: Pale grey/green-grey/brown. Smooth. Vertical lines of brown lenticels.
Slash: Pink/cream/pink with white lines. Honey coloured exudate.
Leaf: Bipinnate, 1 – 2 pairs pinnae, 2 – 3 pairs leaflets per pinna. Alternate. Lflts: Pinnae: Opposite. Leaflets: Opposite.
Petiole: NR.
Lamina: Small/medium. 1 – 7 × 0.5 – 4 cm. Ovate/elliptic, obovate. Cuneate. Rounded. Obtuse/emarginate. Entire. Glabrous.
Domatia: Absent.
Glands: Hemispherical glands between leaflet pairs and pinnae.
Stipules: NR.
Thorns & Spines: Absent.
Flower: Spike.
Fruit: Brown pod. 23 – 60 × 1.8 – 3.1 cm.
Ecology: Riverine and lowland forest.
Distr: C, EA. Southeast Kenya.
Notes: NR.
Uses: The wood is red-brown, straight-grained and moderately heavy. It is used for timber which is suitable for general building work, joinery and canoe making. The tree is used for shade.
Parkia filicoidea Welw. ex Oliv.
Syn. FTEA: NC.
Syn. TTCL: NC.
Syn. other: NR.
Local names: Iseha (T), Mkunde (Sw), Mnyese, Muindi (L).
Bole: Straight. Buttressed. Large. Spreading crown. To 30 m.
Bark: Grey/brown. Smooth/scaly. Vertical lines of brown lenticels. Young branchlets glabrous to puberulous.
Slash: Red/brown with brown/white streaks.
Leaf: Bipinnate, 4 – 11 pairs of pinnae, 11 – 17 pairs of leaflets per pinna. Alternate. Lflts: Pinnae: Opposite. Leaflets: Opposite.
Petiole: Rachis puberulous.
Lamina: Small. 1 – 3 × 0.5 – 1 cm. Oblong. Cuneate. Asymmetrical. Obtuse/retuse. Entire. Glabrous.
Domatia: NR.
Glands: Petiole glandular.
Stipules: NR.
Thorns & Spines: Absent.
Flower: Red/pink/brown, pungent smell. Hanging balls.
Fruit: Dark brown/black long hanging pods, 50 – 60 cm.
Ecology: Riverine, lowland and submontane forest.
Distr: C, EA, LN, LT?, LV. Central, Southern, and Eastern Tropical Africa.
Notes: NR.
Uses: The wood is white, rather soft, and is used for firewood, water containers, stools and beehives. Fruits are edible. The tree is used for shade and amenity.
Tetrapleura tetraptera (Schumach. & Thonn.) Taub.
Syn. FTEA: NC.
Syn. TTCL: NC.
Syn. other: NR.
Local names: Njiligwi (Mw), Mkongoro (L).
Bole: Medium/large. To 30 m.
Bark: Grey/brown. Smooth/rough. Young branchlets glabrous.
Slash: NR.
Leaf: Bipinnate, 5 – 7 pinnae, 6 – 11 pairs of leaflets per pinna. Lflts: Pinnae: Opposite/alternate. Leaflets: Opposite/alternate.
Petiole: 4 – 11 cm
Lamina: Small. 0.5 – 2 × 0.5 – 1.5 cm. Oblong/elliptic. Cuneate. Emarginate. Entire. Glabrous/hairy beneath.
Domatia: Absent.
Glands: Absent.
Stipules: NR.
Thorns & Spines: Absent.
Flower: Yellow/pink. Racemes.
Fruit: Dark brown pods. 12 – 25 × 3.5 – 6.5 cm.
Ecology: Lowland forest.
Distr: C, EA, LT?, LV. Tropical Africa.
Notes: NR.
Uses: Reddish, hard and heavy wood which is used for firewood, building poles, pestles, tool handles and carvings.
Last Updated: 17 June 2017